2021-2022 Tax Bracket Calculator: What are the Federal Income Taxes and Rates?

For 2022, the IRS announced new tax brackets for those filing taxes this year. This was announced at the end of 2021, and there is a lot of change from last year. This is due to high inflation in the United States, which means that the Treasury must keep taxation as fair as possible.

For example, if tax brackets did not change, rising wages, no matter how slow, would push those who, due to inflation, were no longer really earning in real terms, into tax brackets higher. Indeed, it would penalize the Americans through no fault of their own.

How do tax brackets work?

Taxes can be confusing, along with the idea of ​​tax brackets. If you fall into the third bracket of 22% as a single filer, for example, you will not pay the 22% tax level on all of your income, only that over $40,525. For your money under this, you would be taxed 12% of your money over $9,950.

Still confused? Watch this video from Vox who explains it with some graphs. Keep in mind that the video is from 2019, so the values ​​will be different. In principle though, it contains an easy-to-follow guide to how tax brackets work.

Income tax brackets for 2021, broken down by type of return

Tax Brackets for Single Filers

If the taxable income is: The tax due is:
Less than $9,950 10% of taxable income
More than $9,950 but less than or equal to $40,525 $995 plus 12% of excess over $9,950
More than $40,525 but less than or equal to $86,375 $4,664 plus 22% of excess over $40,525
More than $86,375 but less than or equal to $164,925 $14,751 plus 24% of excess over $86,375
More than $164,925 but less than or equal to $209,425 $33,603 plus 32% of excess over $164,925
More than $209,425 but less than or equal to $523,600 $47,843 plus 35% of excess over $209,425
Over $523,600 $157,804.25 plus 37% of excess over $523,600

Separate tax brackets

If the taxable income is: The tax due is:
No more than $9,950 10% of taxable income
More than $9,950 but less than or equal to $40,525 $995 plus 12% of excess over $9,950
More than $40,525 but less than or equal to $86,375 $4,664 plus 22% of excess over $40,525
More than $86,375 but less than or equal to $164,925 $14,751 plus 24% of excess over $86,375
More than $164,925 but less than or equal to $209,425 $33,603 plus 32% of excess over $164,925
More than $209,425 but less than or equal to $314,150 $47,843 plus 35% of excess over $209,425
Over $314,150 $84,496 plus 37% of excess over $314,150

Joint tax brackets

If the taxable income is: The tax due is:
No more than $19,900 10% of taxable income
More than $19,900 but less than or equal to $81,050 $1,990 plus 12% of excess over $19,900
More than $81,050 but less than or equal to $172,750 $9,328 plus 22% of excess over $81,050
More than $172,750 but less than or equal to $329,850 $29,502 plus 24% of excess over $172,750
More than $329,850 but less than or equal to $418,850 $67,206 plus 32% of excess over $329,850
More than $418,850 but less than or equal to $628,300 $95,686 plus 35% of excess over $418,850
Over $628,300 $168,993.50 plus 37% of excess over $628,300

Head of household tax brackets

If the taxable income is: The tax due is:
No more than $14,200 10% of taxable income
More than $14,200 but less than or equal to $54,200 $1,420 plus 12% of excess over $14,200
More than $54,200 but less than or equal to $86,350 $6,220 plus 22% of excess over $54,200
More than $86,350 but less than or equal to $164,900 $13,293 plus 24% of excess over $86,350
More than $164,900 but less than or equal to $209,400 $32,145 plus 32% of excess over $164,900
More than $209,400 but less than or equal to $523,600 $46,385 plus 35% of excess over $209,400
Over $523,600 $156,355 plus 37% of excess over $523,600

Eleanor C. William